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OFSTED and Performance Data

Flushdyke J & I School Ofsted Report Sept 17

Performance

We are very proud of the standards that our children achieve at Flushdyke Junior and infant School. There is an upward trend in standards since our last inspection.  Pupils make good progress throughout our school and the standards of attainment when they leave us, at the end of Key Stage 2, is above the national average.

Government legislation requires all children to be assessed at the end of Foundation Stage, Year 2 and Year 6. In 2014, the government brought out a new, more challenging curriculum for years 1 to 6 and pupils from Year 2 and Year 6 were first tested on this in 2016.  The results of these assessments, plus the previous three years, are shown below.  As the results of the Year 2 and Year 6 2016 tests are based on a different curriculum and different test types, they are not comparable to tests in previous years and therefore are shown as separate data.

Foundation Stage

At the end of Upper Foundation Stage children are assessed on the seven areas of the Early Years curriculum.  Children will either have met that area – expected, exceeded it or be still working towards it.  A child has to achieve expected in the three prime areas: Communication & Language, Physical Development and Personal, Social & Emotional Development (PSED) and Literacy and Numeracy to be classed as having a good level of development.

Year 2

In May 2016, children were tested in Reading and Maths on tests relating to the new curriculum.  These, together with pupils’ class work, helped form the basis of the teacher assessment for these subjects. In addition to this, pupils’ work was teacher assessed for writing and science.  Again, these were assessed against the new, more challenging curriculum.
In these new assessments, children are graded as follows:  PreKeystage = not yet working within KS1; Working Towards = working towards the expected standard for Year 2, but not quite there yet; Expected = working at the expected standard for a Year 2 pupil; Greater Depth = working at a deeper level than the expected standard (able to apply their knowledge to a range of situations).

 

Up until 2015, government legislation required the school to carry out tasks and tests in English and Maths for all Year 2 pupils.  These were administered in the summer term.  The role of the tasks and tests was to help the teacher determine the final assessment judgement at the end of Key Stage 1 (end of Year 2). Children were also assessed in science.  Children were expected to be at Level 2, with Level 2B being the average level of development for a child this age.  Level 3 was above average.

Year 6

In May of Year 6, all Year 6 pupils take externally set tests in Reading, EPGS (English punctuation, grammar and spelling) and Maths.  These papers are marked externally.  In addition to this the children achieve a moderated writing grade.
In 2016 the tests were based on the new, more challenging curriculum and a different grading system was used to assess attainment and progress.
In these new assessments, children are graded as follows:  PreKeystage = not yet working within KS2; Working Towards = working towards the expected standard for Year 6, but not quite there yet; Expected = working at the expected standard for a Year 6 pupil; Greater Depth/ Higher Level= working at a deeper level than the expected standard (able to apply their knowledge to a range of situations).
Children in Year 6 were also given a scaled score for their attainment in Reading, EPGS and Maths, with 100 being the expected score for Year 6 pupils.  If a child achieved a scaled score of 110 or above, they were considered to be working at the higher level.

Attainment
2016 results (attainment) .Cohort size -14

Up until 2016, the Year 6 tests were graded in levels. Children were expected to achieve a Level 4, with Level 4B being the average level of development for a child of this age.  Level 5 was above average.  In our school these percentages can be skewed with very small cohorts.

Progress

It is also important to look at the progress our children are making. In 2016, children were grouped according to their Key Stage 1 (KS1) results and the average progress for each of these groups was attained nationally.  Children were then compared with this average.  If a child achieves a positive progress score, it has made more than the anticipated expected progress from KS1.  If a child achieves zero, it has made the anticipated progress from KS1 and if a child achieves a negative progress score, it has not made as much progress as anticipated from their KS1 results.

2016 results (progress)

Prior to 2016, the government target was that children should make 2 levels of progress from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 2.

Progress from end of KS1 to end of KS2

 

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Performance Data – At a Glance

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